We need your help or the bill will die!

WE NEED YOU OR THIS BILL WILL DIE!

These Democratic legislators have NOT announced support for the National Popular Vote bill, HB 5434. Ahead of our Wednesday, April 26th Lobby Day, please call and email them! Despite having 57 co-sponsors, without their support, this bill WILL die!

Please start by emailing the Speaker of the House, Rep. Joe Aresimowicz: Joe.Aresimowicz@cga.ct.gov or calling him at 860-240-8535.

Then move on to your representative and senator if they’re on the list. If you’re up for it, you can then reach out to legislators near you!

Title Name District Towns Email Phone LOB Room
Rep. Abercrombie, Catherine 83 Meriden, Berlin Catherine.Abercrombie@cga.ct.gov 860-240-0492 2002
Rep. Adams, Terry 146 Stamford Terry.B.Adams@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1377 4020
Rep. Arconti, David 109 Danbury David.Arconti@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1376 4034
Rep. Aresimowicz, Joe 30 Berlin, Southington Joe.Aresimowicz@cga.ct.gov 860-240-8535 4105
Rep. Baker, Andre 124 Bridgeport Andre.Baker@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1371 4037
Rep. Boyd, Patrick 50 Brooklyn, Eastford, Pomfret, Union, Woodstock Pat.Boyd@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1372 4005
Rep. Currey, Jeff 11 East Hartford, Manchester, South Windsor Jeff.Currey@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1378 4010
Rep. Dillon, Patricia 92 New Haven Patricia.Dillon@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1377 4019
Rep. Fox, Daniel 148 Stamford Dan.Fox@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1372 2202
Rep. Gentile, Linda 104 Ansonia, Derby Linda.Gentile@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1372 4109
Rep. Guerrera, Antonio 29 Newington, Rocky Hill, Wethersfield Tony.Guerrera@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1377 2301
Rep. Miller, Patricia Billie 145 Stamford Patricia.Miller@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1375 4033
Rep. Paolillo, Alphonse 97 New Haven Alphonse.Paolillo@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1371 5008
Rep. Reed, Lonnie 102 Branford Lonnie.Reed@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1378 3902
Rep. Reyes, Geraldo 75 Waterbury Geraldo.Reyes@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1377 4024
Rep. Ritter, Matthew 1 Hartford Matthew.Ritter@cga.ct.gov 860-240-8489 4106
Rep. Rosario, Christopher 128 Bridgeport Christopher.Rosario@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1375 4115
Rep. Rovero, Daniel 51 Killingly, Putnam, Thompson Danny.Rovero@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1371 4004
Rep. Serra, Joseph 33 Middletown Joseph.Serra@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1378 4021
Rep. Simmons, Caroline 144 Stamford Caroline.Simmons@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1376 c110
Rep. Tong, William 147 Stamford, Darien William.Tong@cga.ct.gov 860-240-0532 2502
Rep. Ziogas, Christopher 79 Bristol Chris.Ziogas@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1378 4016
Senator Doyle, Paul 9 Cromwell, Middletown, Newington, Rocky Hill & Wethersfield paul.doyle@cga.ct.gov 860-240-0475
Senator Hartley, Joan 15 Waterbury, Middlebury & Naugatuck joan.hartley@cga.ct.gov 860-240-0006
Senator Kennedy, Ted 12 Branford, Durham, Guilford, Killingworth, Madison & North Branford ted.kennedy@cga.ct.gov 860-240-0455
Senator Larson, Timothy 3 East Hartford, East Windsor, Ellington & South Windsor timothy.larson@cga.ct.gov 860-240-0511
Senator Leone, Carlo 27 Stamford & Darien carlo.leone@cga.ct.gov 860-240-0589
Senator Slossberg, Gayle 14 Milford, Orange, West Haven & Woodbridge gayle.slossberg@cga.ct.gov 860-240-0482

Democrat or Republican, we need you to contact your state representative and state legislator before the end of the day Wednesday and let them know – even if it’s for the umpteenth time – that you want them to support the National Popular Vote bill, HB 5434.

If you haven’t filled out our volunteer survey about how you’d like to be involved, please take a minute and do so – this bill won’t pass without your help!

HOW TO EXPRESS YOUR SUPPORT FOR HB 5434

Communicating in your own words is best, but here are ways to express your support that you can use as starting points, or to copy & paste. Explain why this is important to you.

  1. Presidential candidates rarely campaign in Connecticut. With the National Popular Vote Compact, HB 5434, every vote in CT would matter and candidates would pay attention to us. Do you favor the Compact? If not, why don’t you believe that every vote should matter equally?
  2. I’m tired of hearing that battleground states are the only ones that matter in presidential elections.  What about Connecticut?  With HB 5434, the National Popular Vote Compact, our votes would matter the same as votes in OH, FL and PA. Please let me know if you support the bill, and if not, why not?
  3. I’m writing to let you know I support HB5434, the National Popular Vote Compact that awards the presidency to the candidate who receives the most votes nationwide. The Compact would make one person, one vote a reality. Are you in favor of the Compact? If not, can you explain why every vote shouldn’t count equally, no matter what state you live in?
  4. I believe in a democracy every vote should matter equally and the president should be the candidate who gets the most votes. Under the current state-by-state winner-take-all method of awarding electoral votes, it doesn’t work that way. Please support HB5434, the National Popular Vote Compact. Will you vote yes on HB5434? If no, why not?
  5. Please co-sponsor HB 5434 to elect the President by the popular vote in all 50 states. Please let me know if you support the bill, and if not, why not?
  6. Please support HB 5434 so that every vote matters equally when we elect our President. Will you vote yes?
  7. I think the candidate who gets the most votes should win. Please support HB 5434, the National Popular Vote Compact. Will you vote yes?
  8. Please co-sponsor HB5434 to help make one person, one vote a reality. Will you vote yes? If no, why not?
  9. Please co-sponsor HB5434, the NPV compact. In a democracy every vote should matter equally and the president should be the candidate who gets the most votes.
  10. I’m tired of hearing that battleground states are the only ones that matter. With HB 5434 our votes would matter the same as votes in OH, FL and PA.

Join us April 26 for Lobby Day in Hartford!

The National Popular Vote bill now has 55 co-sponsors(!) but we need to convince undecided legislators to support the bill or it will die.

Please join us and spread the word about our lobby day from 11 am to 1 pm on Wednesday, April 26th at the Legislative Office Building in Hartford.

Republicans voted party-line to oppose National Popular Vote legislation so we need as many Democrats as we can to co-sponsor. For a full list of Democratic legislators (and their contact info!) who have not announced their support for the National Popular Vote bill, HB 5434, please click here.

Contact former co-sponsors who have NOT co-sponsored HB 5434

Contact Former co-sponsors

We’ve had great success recruiting additional co-sponsors for HB 5434, the National Popular Vote bill. We started with 11 co-cosponsors – there are now 53! But there are still a handful of legislators who have supported national popular vote legislation in the past but have NOT yet co-sponsored HB 5434 this session.

Please call / email these legislators and ask them to join 53 others in co-sponsoring:

Rep. Gonzalez Minnie.Gonzalez@cga.ct.gov 860-240-8514
Rep. Morin Russell.Morin@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1378
Rep. Morris Bruce.Morris@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1373
Rep. Verrengia Joe.Verrengia@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1373
Rep. Berger Jeffrey.Berger@cga.ct.gov 860-240-1372
Sen. Gomes Ed.Gomes@cga.ct.gov 860-240-0509

For talking points and writing guidelines, please scroll to the bottom of this page.

CONTACT the speaker

We also need you to call and email the Speaker of the House, Rep. Joe Aresimowicz, and urge him to bring the bill to the floor for a vote:

Rep. Aresimowicz Joe.Aresimowicz@cga.ct.gov 860-240-8535

CONTACT Other Democratic Legislators who Have not co-sponsored

We need every Democrat to back this bill to get it passed. You can find a list full list of Democrats who have NOT yet co-sponsored here if you’d like to contact them as well!

For talking points and writing guidelines, please see below.

how to express your support for hb 5434

Communicating in your own words is best, but here are ways to express your support that you can use as starting points, or to copy & paste. Explain why this is important to you.

  1. Presidential candidates rarely campaign in Connecticut. With the National Popular Vote Compact, HB 5434, every vote in CT would matter and candidates would pay attention to us. Do you favor the Compact? If not, why don’t you believe that every vote should matter equally?
  2. I’m tired of hearing that battleground states are the only ones that matter in presidential elections.  What about Connecticut?  With HB 5434, the National Popular Vote Compact, our votes would matter the same as votes in OH, FL and PA. Please let me know if you support the bill, and if not, why not?
  3. I’m writing to let you know I support HB5434, the National Popular Vote Compact that awards the presidency to the candidate who receives the most votes nationwide. The Compact would make one person, one vote a reality. Are you in favor of the Compact? If not, can you explain why every vote shouldn’t count equally, no matter what state you live in?
  4. I believe in a democracy every vote should matter equally and the president should be the candidate who gets the most votes. Under the current state-by-state winner-take-all method of awarding electoral votes, it doesn’t work that way. Please support HB5434, the National Popular Vote Compact. Will you vote yes on HB5434? If no, why not?
  5. Please co-sponsor HB 5434 to elect the President by the popular vote in all 50 states. Please let me know if you support the bill, and if not, why not?
  6. Please support HB 5434 so that every vote matters equally when we elect our President. Will you vote yes?
  7. I think the candidate who gets the most votes should win. Please support HB 5434, the National Popular Vote Compact. Will you vote yes?
  8. Please co-sponsor HB5434 to help make one person, one vote a reality. Will you vote yes? If no, why not?
  9. Please co-sponsor HB5434, the NPV compact. In a democracy every vote should matter equally and the president should be the candidate who gets the most votes.
  10. I’m tired of hearing that battleground states are the only ones that matter. With HB 5434 our votes would matter the same as votes in OH, FL and PA.

Legislators who have NOT co-sponsored National Popular Vote legislation

The National Popular Vote bill, HB 5434, made it out of committee but will only pass if Connecticut Democrats can stay unified in strong support for it.

To that end, we are asking every Democratic legislator to commit not
only to vote for the bill, but to co-sponsor it. Here is a list of legislators of legislators who have NOT yet co-sponsored National Popular Vote legislation this session – and their contact information!

Please call, email or write!

Popular Vote Compact would enable “one person, one vote”

A version of this letter by Cynara Stites appeared in the Chronicle.

The Electoral College flouts the democratic principle of “one person/one vote” in presidential elections because many citizens’ votes are disregarded by the Electoral College. Most states, including Connecticut, use the “winner-takes- all” method. These states cast all of their Electoral College votes for the presidential candidate who got the majority or plurality of the citizens’ votes in the state. That’s why Hillary Clinton got all seven of Connecticut’s Electoral College votes even though Donald Trump got 41.2% of Connecticut citizens’ votes. Many Trump voters whose votes were disregarded by the Electoral College live in eastern Connecticut.

Nationwide, over four million citizens voted for Clinton in states where Trump won the elections. Those citizens’ votes for Clinton translated into zero Electoral College votes for Clinton. That’s a lot of uncounted votes. Since the nationwide popular vote was first recorded in 1824, five presidential candidates who won the nationwide popular vote lost the elections in the Electoral College.

Repealing the 12th Amendment, which establishes the Electoral College, requires two-thirds of the House and Senate and three-fourths of the state legislatures to vote for repeal. This won’t happen any time soon.

The proposed National Popular Vote Interstate Compact will assure that the presidential candidate who wins the majority of votes nationwide will be elected President by the Electoral College. States who sign on to the compact will pledge to cast their Electoral College votes for the candidate who wins the national popular vote. The compact will go into effect when it has enough states to cast the majority of Electoral College votes.

This will assure that no American’s vote will be disregarded, the candidate who wins the nationwide popular vote will win the election, and the election will really be a democratic “one person/one vote” election.

Popular vote compact would make your vote matter

A version of this letter by Jen Panko was published in the Norwich Bulletin.

In its March 1 editorial, “Take the long route toward popular vote,” The Bulletin supported a constitutional amendment creating a system “in which the person with the most votes always wins” even though it recognizes it “may be near impossible.” It believes the National Popular Vote Compact, which guarantees the presidency to the winner of the popular vote, would “disconnect” voters from their electoral votes. It wouldn’t.

The Constitution says “Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors.” Nothing about winner-take-all appears in the Constitution. Because Connecticut uses winner-take-all, the 673,215 voters who cast ballots for Donald Trump could have stayed home; they had no impact on the outcome. How did that “connect” Trump voters to anything?

The Bulletin suggests a better alternative is to allocate electoral votes in proportion to Connecticut votes cast for each candidate. Why does The Bulletin believe joining the compact is subversive but its alternative isn’t?

If you believe every vote cast for president should matter equally and the winner should be the candidate who receives the most votes, ask your state legislators to support H.B. 5434 to join the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact.

State should join Popular Vote Compact

A version of this letter by Michael Barker was published in the Trumbull Times.

The voters of Connecticut have an important opportunity to make sure that all of their votes are counted in the election of the President and Vice President. The opportunity is for the Connecticut legislature to agree that the winners of these two national offices should be decided by a national popular vote. This means that all voters, whether they are in the majority or the minority in Connecticut, would have their votes counted directly in the national elections.

Under the current electoral college system, most states have a winner-take-all approach, which awards all of the state’s electoral votes to whichever candidate wins the most votes within the state. This means that all of the individual votes by the minority are negated and do not count directly towards the national election. It also means that the voters in different states have unequal weight because of how the electoral college is composed. As a result, national campaigns focus their time and money on just a few swing states, and do not pay much attention to states like Connecticut, which are not seen as competitive.

These and other problems can be cured by the National Popular Vote Compact, which is a proposed agreement among the states that they will award all of their electoral college votes to whichever candidate receives the most individual votes nationally. The Connecticut bill to join the Compact, H.B. 5434, is pending in the Government Administration and Elections Committee. More than 100 people turned out to the GAE Committee hearing on the Compact on February 22, the most any on the committee could remember ever having attended—truly grassroots support on display. The bill has been endorsed by Governor Malloy, Lieutenant Governor Wyse, and Majority Leader Duff, among others.

The Compact has already been adopted by 10 states and the District of Columbia, representing 165 electoral votes. The Compact would go into effect once adopted by states representing a majority of the electoral votes – 270 out of 538. The electoral college is preserved, but the states would now direct that their electoral votes be awarded to the winner of the national popular vote.

Connecticut should join this effort to make sure that all votes are counted equally in selecting the President and Vice President. Presidential campaigns would have to reach out to all voters, including in Connecticut, and not just those in swing states. All Connecticut voters, both majority and minority, would have a greater incentive to vote because their votes matter nationally. I hope everyone in Trumbull will join me in supporting H.B. 5434 and ask our representatives to stand up for equal voting for national offices.

One person, one vote principle violated

A version of this letter by Jean Koeppel, director of Democracy Awakens Connecticut, was published in the Register Citizen

Reform the Electoral College so the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for president.

Many believe we are a democratic country, maybe even the top democracy in the world, but the United States was founded as a Constitutional Republic. And as of last month, the Democracy Index Report (issued annually by The Economist, Intelligence Unit) has demoted the U.S. to a “flawed democracy.”

The Economist uses a range of criteria to rank the leading democracies in the world, but one clear benchmark is a county’s ability to hold free and fair elections. According to the report, the fact that the winner of a U.S. presidential election is not necessarily the person who receives the most votes is undemocratic. Our leaders are not elected directly by the people. They are elected by electors that represent the people.

There are 538 electors that form the Electoral College, a group of citizens appointed by the political parties in each state. The Electoral College violates the principle of “one person, one vote” because it awards more voting power to people in small states.

For example, half a million Wyoming voters are represented by 3 electors. If California had equal representation, it would get about 229 electors. But it only gets 55.

It takes just over 2 1/2 Connecticut votes to equal 1 vote in Wyoming. It takes 3 1/2 Texan votes to equal 1 vote in Vermont.

Presently, there is no way to hold free and fair elections in our modern constitutional republic. And it is highly unlikely that the U.S. Constitution will be amended anytime soon to guarantee that the popular vote wins a presidential election.

But that’s where the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (NPVIC) comes into play. This compact is an agreement among a group of U.S. states and the District of Columbia to award all their respective electoral votes to whichever presidential candidate wins the overall popular vote in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The NPVIC would guarantee the presidency to the candidate who receives the most popular votes.

This Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 10 a.m., the Connecticut General Assembly is holding a public hearing at the state Legislative Office Building in Hartford to determine if Connecticut should pass the National Popular Vote Bill (H.B. 5434).

This is not the first time a public hearing has been held for this bill. However, in part, due to lack of public interest, the National Popular Vote Bill has still not found its way through the Senate to be passed.

It’s time to reform the election system for president so that our votes here in Connecticut matter. The General Assembly should put Connecticut’s interests first this session by passing national popular vote legislation. Electing the president by popular vote would put Connecticut — and the concerns of all its citizens — back on the electoral map.

For more information about how you can demonstrate your support for this bill and to attend the public gathering and hearing on Wednesday, visit www.democracyawakensct.org or www.npvct.com.

Connecticut should support the national popular vote

The General Assembly should put Connecticut’s interests first this session by passing national popular vote legislation. Electing the president by popular vote would put Connecticut – and the concerns of all its citizens – back on the electoral map.

In the current state-by-state, winner-take-all Electoral College system, a handful of swing states decide each presidential election. While Connecticut residents watch far-flung rallies on the nightly news, presidential candidates shower swing states with attention. Once elected, our presidents reward these states with disproportionate amounts of federal funding.

As the federal government doles out hundreds of billions of dollars in grant funding each year, swing states receive on average 7.5% more in grants. They’re twice as likely to get presidential disaster declarations and the federal funds that come with them. Moving to a national popular vote would help Connecticut get its fair share because a popular vote, in President Trump’s words, “brings all the states into play.”

It may be surprising to find President Trump, and other Republican leaders like Newt Gingrich, agreeing with progressives like Howard Dean and Jill Stein on this issue. Yet here in Connecticut, national popular vote legislation has received favorable, bipartisan recommendations from the Government Administration and Elections committee four times in the last eight years. This widespread agreement stems from the fact that a national popular vote would better represent the views of citizens across the political spectrum.

The current Electoral College system effectively disenfranchises millions of Americans in predictably red and blue states. Few should understand this better than Connecticut Republicans, whose votes for president haven’t mattered since 1988, when George H.W. Bush won the state. Their votes – and their views – should count for just as much as those of citizens in other states, but they don’t.

Meanwhile, Democrats are still bruising from Hillary Clinton’s Electoral College loss, despite her popular vote victory of nearly 3 million votes. Should the votes of these millions of men and women carry no weight? In an election decided by less than 100,000 votes in three states, the votes of more than 200,000 Connecticut citizens essentially didn’t count because they were cast on the wrong side of state lines. Is that fair?

Given the 2016 results, Republicans may fear that moving to the popular vote would hurt their party (although the President certainly doesn’t think so). But in 2004, had 60,000 Ohio voters switched from George Bush to John Kerry, Bush would have won the popular vote by a margin similar to Hillary Clinton’s popular vote victory but lost the presidency.

The president should represent every American equally – no matter their gender, race, religion, political views, or home state. In all other elections, the candidate with the most votes wins. Our highest office should be no different.

Joining the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact can help Connecticut get its fair share and help our state lead the nation towards a more equitable, more representative and more perfect Union. Already adopted by ten states and the District of Columbia, the Compact is an agreement among states to award their Electoral College votes to the winner of the national popular vote. When states holding a majority of Electoral College votes sign onto the Compact, it will go into effect, making the national popular vote winner the president.

The Compact would not abolish the Electoral College. But it would allow for a national popular vote within the confines of the Constitution, which gives the states the power to appoint Electors, “in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct.” Thus, by taking action together, states can make the change to the national popular vote – without amending the Constitution.

Governor Malloy has joined leaders of both parties in expressing his support for this national popular vote legislation. It’s time for the legislature to send the national popular vote bill to his desk so he can sign it.

A version of this piece by Steven Winter has been submitted to the Hartford Courant as an editorial.

Put Connecticut First and Support The National Popular Vote Compact HB 5434

A version of this letter by Stephanie R. Paulmeno, MS, RN, NHA, CPH, CCM, CDP
CEO, Global Health Systems Consultants, LLC appeared in the Greenwich Free Press.

The National Popular Vote Compact, H.B. 5434 is coming up shortly before Connecticut’s Government Administration and Elections Committee. What it achieves is that when States holding enough popular votes sign onto this compact it becomes effective nation-wide; henceforth the winner of the National Popular Vote in a presidential election becomes the winner of the Electoral vote AND THE PRESIDENCY. A presidential candidate will be voted in (or out) by ALL the people. Equally important, this action is within the four corners of the Constitution, and would not necessitate an amendment.

It has bi-partisan support on the committee and the committee has already recommended it for approval four times. Why bipartisan support? Because this could impact a Democratic candidate with equal negating impact as it would a Republican candidate. The compact has already been adopted by 10 states and the District of Columbia. Governor Malloy has aligned with leaders from both the Democratic and Republican Parties in support of the National Popular Vote Bill. The people of Connecticut deserve an equal vote in deciding who assumes the presidency in a national election. Under the status quo today, a small handful of battleground states get to elect the country’s president and we in Connecticut are no more than mere spectators in the national process. Even post-election, it is those same battleground states that receive the higher proportion, about 7 %, of presidentially controlled or influenced grants. Candidates know where their bread is buttered and which states are not worth their time or their “ear.” Connecticut needs to get into play!

Currently, using the state-by- state winner-takes- all philosophy, the people of Connecticut and the rest of the predictably “red” AND “blue” states are, in essence, disenfranchised. In Connecticut, which is a traditionally blue state, the votes and views of our Republican voters have been basically unheard. Why should all the bi-partisan voices of the people of Connecticut be of lesser value than those of a mere handful of states that can be swayed by political pandering of one Party or the other to obtain their votes in a Presidential election? It is not right!  I would not be surprised if this is a factor in why many in Connecticut do not come out to vote! Their popular vote means nothing.

If we were to use the National Popular Vote results in elections, this would better represent the views of our Connecticut voters across the political spectrum. Connecticut legislators on both sides of the aisle need to “Put Connecticut First” and support the National Popular Vote Compact, HB 5434.